Assessment of clinical residents' needs for ten educational subjects

Mansour Razavi

Abstract


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Background:Fulfilling the learners'  "real  needs"  will improve medical education. There are  subjects that are necessary for any clinical residents not considering their field of specialty. Among the subjects ten seems to be the most important: research methodology and data analysis, computer-based programs, medical recording, cardiopulmonary and cerebral resuscitation, clinical teaching programs, communication skills, clinical ethics, laboratory examinations, reporting special"diseases and death certification, and prescription.

Purpose: This cross-sectional study assessed educational needs of clinical residents for ten educational subjects.

Methods: A questionnaire prepared by board faculty members consisted of 10 close-ended questions, and one open­ ended question was distributed among 1307 residents from 22 clinical disciplines, who registered for preboard or promotion exam in June 2000.

Results: Among the subjects three were the most needed: computer-based programs 149 (60%), data collecting system

606 (49%), and clinical ethics 643 (46%). The prescription standard was the least required 177(13%). Conclusion   Complementary training courses on these subjects can be an answer to the clinical residents needs.

Keywords :  research methodology, computer in medicine, cpr, clinical teaching methods, communication in medicine, medical ethics, laboratory ordering, disease coding system, death certificate, prescription writing

Keywords


esearch methodology, computer in medicine, cpr, clinical teaching methods, communication in medicine, medical ethics, laboratory ordering, disease coding system, death certificate, prescription writing

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22037/jme.v1i3.947

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