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Outcome of Accidental Exposure Prone to Blood Borne Viral Infections in an Educational Hospital

Shahnaz Sali, Shabnam Tehrani, Sara Abolghasemi
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Abstract

Background: The risk for transmission of blood-borne viruses (BBVs) such as Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) due to occupational exposure is a major concern in the health care setting.

Materials and Methods: This study among 337 health care workers (HCWs) accidentally exposed to BBVs was carried out from January 2009 to March 2015. The data were reviewed in labbafinejhad hospital, Tehran, Iran.

Results: 4 HCWs had exposure to HBS Ag positive, which HBS antibody titer of them was higher than 10 mlu/ml, 6 HCWs were exposed to HCV seropositive patients underwent laboratory investigations for  HCV-antibody on 4,12, 24 weeks that results were negative. 3 cases had exposure to HIV seropositive patients which received standard antiretroviral post exposure prophylaxis.

Conclusion: Timely performance for PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis) reducing BBVs transmission among HCWs.

prophylaxis.

 Conclusions: Timely performance for  PEP(Post Exposure Prophylaxis) reducing BBVs transmission among HCWs.

Key words: Outcome; Accidental Exposure; Blood Borne Viral Infections


Keywords

Outcome, Accidental Exposure, Blood Borne Viral Infections

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22037/nbm.v4i2.10014