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Information Diet in Covid-19 Crisis; a Commentary

Hasan Ashrafi-rizi, Zahra Kazempour
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Abstract

By the beginning of COVID-19 crisis in China in late 2019, and its spread throughout the world in early 2020, countries around the world experienced numerous problems (1).The outbreak of the new Coronavirus started in Wuhan, and this third epidemic of Coronaviruses expanded to the middle east promptly. . Therefore, the World Health Organization (WHO)  expressed its concerns about the Coronavirus crisis (2). This crisis caused production and publication of large amounts of valid and invalid information, eventually leading to information obesity phenomenon. Information obesity can have many negative consequences on the general population, causing major problems for governments, especially if the amount of invalid information is too large. It is worth to mention that however almost impossible, controlling and monitoring media is a massive challenge for different governments. Hence, individuals should protect themselves against unreliable information, and pursue an authentic “information diet”. In the present study, authors have explained and interpreted the concept of the information diet, proposed by Johnson, based on scientific evidence, observation of media news and the social media environment, to help maintain the use of valid information in facing the new Coronavirus crisis.


Keywords

Coronavirus, Information Diet, Information Obesity, Disaster Planning, Confidential Information,

References

Ashrafi-rizi H, Kazempour Z. Information Typology in Coronavirus (COVID-19) Crisis; a Commentary. Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine.8(1):19.

Alavi-Moghaddam M. A Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak from Wuhan City in China, Rapid Need for Emergency Departments Preparedness and Response; a Letter to Editor. A Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak from Wuhan City in China, Rapid Need for Emergency Departments Preparedness and Response; a Letter to Editor. 2020;8(1):1-2.

Keshavarz H. Information Seeking: from information needs to information credibility. Tehran: Ketabdar Publishing; 2015.

Johnson C. The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption. USA: O'Reilly Media; 2012.

McMullan RD, Berle D, Arnáez S, Starcevic V. The relationships between health anxiety, online health information seeking, and cyberchondria: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of affective disorders. 2019;245:270-8.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.22037/aaem.v8i1.605

DOI (PDF): https://doi.org/10.22037/aaem.v8i1.605.g741

DOI (HTML): https://doi.org/10.22037/aaem.v8i1.605.g745